Category Archives: Information and Advice

Our Sleep Team

Find out more about our brilliant team of Sleep Practitioners.

Pattie Everitt

Sleep Practitioner for Cerebra since 2005. Pattie originally trained at University of West England as a nurse and has had training in autism, anxiety and behaviour and relaxation for children. Pattie did her Sleep Training with Sleep Scotland.

Claire Varey

Sleep Practitioner for Cerebra since 2015. Claire worked in health visiting, school nursing and breastfeeding support as a Lactation Consultant in the NHS. Claire also supported parents to understand the common sleep issues that babies and infants experienced as part of their development as a Baby Calm and Toddler Calm teacher. Claire did her Sleep Training with Sleep Scotland.

Sarah Coldrey

Sleep Practitioner for Cerebra since 2010. Sarah has a degree in Psychology and a postgraduate certificate in positive approaches to challenging behaviour. Sarah did her Sleep Training with Sleep Scotland.

Laura MacDonald

Sleep Practitioner since April 2017. Laura started with Cerebra in 2015 as a Regional Officer. Laura has a degree in Psychology. She has worked with adults and children with autism and challenging behaviour for several years. Laura did her Sleep Training with Sleep Scotland.

Catherine Stone

Sleep Practitioner for Cerebra since 2012. Catherine has a degree in Social Inclusion and Education Studies. Prior to this Catherine helped young people with learning difficulties into work experience. Catherine finds her job very rewarding supporting families to overcome some of the challenges that they experience. No one day as a Sleep Practitioner is the same, which makes it a very exciting and challenging role. Catherine did her Sleep Training with Sleep Southampton.

Kaileigh Wilson

Sleep Administrator – Based in our Head Office in Carmarthen
Kaileigh has worked for Cerebra for 8 years and as a sleep administrator for 6 years. This year she will be undertaking sleep training where she will then be able to offer front line support and advice to our families.

Disabled Facilities Grants

The school of law team at the University of Leeds

The school of law team at the University of Leeds

Our student researchers at the School of Law, University of Leeds, have published a report on Disabled Facilities Grants and home adaptations.

Disabled children and their families are legally entitled to a grant to pay for necessary adaptations to their home to improve accessibility and independent enjoyment of their surroundings. These are known as Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) and are usually for sums up to £30,000. The main aim of our DFG Project is to assess the cost effectiveness of DFGs and the wider impact adaptations have on the disabled child and their families.

The latest report from the team considers the benefits of investing in home adaptations for disabled children, including cost savings and improvements in well-being.

You can read the full report here.

How behaviour problems can affect family life

Jane Raca, whose son James has learning disabilities, autism and challenging behaviour shares her story and explains how you can get involved in research that will help other families.

“When James was little he used to pinch me if he was cross. He couldn’t walk or talk, so his means of communication were limited. The pinching didn’t hurt too much and he developed a graduated system of pinches which even made me rather proud! If he wanted my attention and I was preoccupied, he would pinch lightly. If he was getting agitated and wanted to leave a noisy place, the pressure would increase until I got the message.

As he grew older and stronger, the squeezing inevitably inflicted more damage. I once got him stuck in a doorway in his electric wheelchair and ended up with a black bruise the size of a saucer under my arm. Despite this, I was surprised when one of his social workers confessed to me that she was afraid of him. It had not occurred to me to be frightened. He was my son and I loved him; I knew he wasn’t being malicious. If you can’t walk or talk and you get overwhelmed by crowds, or the tiniest change in routine, there are only so many ways you can say so.

The social worker’s comments made me think though and I realised that although I wasn’t scared, I was on a constant state of high alert, trying to avoid an outburst. I was also worried about James’s brother and sister and felt I had to protect them from him. It wasn’t much fun for them getting into the car with someone who might attack them, or going to the cinema with someone who might bite them if he got anxious. They started refusing to go anywhere with James and becoming quiet and withdrawn.

I wasn’t getting much sleep and the psychological strain of managing James’s moods on a minute by minute basis contributed to my emotional exhaustion. Eventually I had a nervous breakdown. As I was the main carer of James and his two siblings, this had a profound impact on the family. My husband was alarmed at the fact that I seemed to need to sleep for 20 hours out of every 24, and he had to hold the fort at home as well as work. Our marriage was under severe strain. My mother travelled miles to support us every weekend.

What I didn’t know at that time was that what was happening to my family was not unusual. There is now a much greater awareness of the potential challenges of having an autistic child. However, the resources available to help are still woefully inadequate. Now there is an opportunity to improve that. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence ‘NICE’ has identified that behaviour that challenges is common in children with a learning disability and can have a considerable impact on them and their family members or carers.

For example it is a common reason for residential placements with associated high costs. NICE has recommended that research be carried out into preventing behaviour that challenges from developing in young children with a learning disability. This is important because NICE is an independent body set up to advise the NHS among others. Its role includes providing strong, research based evidence which has the power to persuade governments to formulate or change policy.

Now, The Cerebra Family Research Group based at CEDAR, a research centre headed by Professor Richard Hastings at The University of Warwick, is calling for 1000 families of children with a learning disability to volunteer to take part in a study over time. The study will look at the well-being of family members where a child has a learning disability, not just mothers, but fathers and siblings as well. The study will further the understanding of what it is like to raise a child with a learning disability in the UK and may ultimately lead to greater resources being available for families like ours.

Professor Hastings, who is also Chair of Family Research for the charity Cerebra, says that many studies show that mothers of children with learning disabilities and autism experience more stress from their children’s behaviour problems compared to other children. He says that fathers and siblings also report more psychological problems when a child with learning disabilities or autism has significant behaviour problems. This doesn’t surprise me at all.

If your child is between 4 and 15 years, 11 months old and has learning disabilities (including children with autism or any one of a number of genetic syndromes as well) please consider taking part. It could make a real difference.

To find out more about the study and to complete the online survey please visit the website. If you have any questions please contact the research team by email: familyresearch@warwick.ac.uk or telephone: 02476 524 139.”

©Jane Raca 2016, writing as a parent contributor for the Family Research Ambassadors Project run by the Centre for Education, Development and Research (CEDAR), at the University of Warwick and Cerebra.

Social Care Guides – England and Wales

social care guidesOne of the results of devolution is that in a number of areas of the law England and Wales are developing different approaches – these are sometimes very different.

The law dealing with social care is no exception and both England and Wales have seen changes in this area in the recent past. The changes in Wales in particular are significant and social services teams are still getting to grips with implementing them.

We have therefore developed two guides on social care, one for England and one for Wales which explain the different systems.

We would particularly recommend them to anyone moving between the two countries.

SEN Reforms in England and Wales

sen reformsIn England, the special educational needs (SEN) reforms introduced in September 2014 continue to be rolled out.

Although all SEN statements should be converted into Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans by April 2018 recent government figures show that 45% of the statements are still in place with only 19 out of the 152 English local authorities currently on track to meet the deadline.

Clearly, many families are still waiting for statements to be converted to an EHC plan and they can get more information about the process from our guide on Education in England: Statements of Special Educational Needs: A Guide for Parents.

However, those families undergoing assessment for an EHC plan, and those who already have one, will find the information they need in the recently revised guide Education Health and Care (EHC) Plans. (Education in England: A Guide for Parents).

Meanwhile in Wales, the Welsh Government’s proposed SEN reforms, which it hopes will pass into law at the end of the year, continue with the Additional Learning Needs and Education Tribunal (Wales) Bill being scrutinised by the Welsh Assembly.

At the same time a consultation is being carried out on how the reforms should be introduced. For now, however, nothing has changed and the current system remains in place meaning that parents can continue to request an assessment for a SEN statement. Information on the Welsh system can be found in Education in Wales: A Guide for Parents.

Massage Helps Improve Bedtime Routine

Our Sleep Practitioner Pattie Everitt was recently able to help Freddie and his mum Abbie build a better bed time routine, improving the quality of family life for everyone.

Freddie had problems with night waking from around 9 months old.  He was not crying or upset but tended to talk to himself, shout and make loud noises. His mum, Abbie, got in contact with us when Freddie was 4 years old. He went to sleep fine each night, but was often awake for long periods during the night, sometimes up to 4-5 hours. Abbie would try to calm him down and get him back to sleep, but nothing seemed to work.

Pattie Everitt, one of our Sleep Practitioners, went to visit Abbie to discuss some new ideas she could try.  Although he was settling quite well, they talked about how making Freddie more relaxed before bed might help him sleep better at night.  This included introducing a wind down routine that was relaxing for him, and Abbie decided to try a back massage to help calm him down before bed.  They also discussed using weighted objects, such as heavy cuddly toys/ wheat sacks that might help Freddie feel more secure. Pattie also suggest a slightly later bedtime as he was going to bed quite early.

After some ongoing email support, Abbie managed to improve Freddie’s sleep quite a bit. The waking in the night reduced enough so that is was more manageable, with him not waking until around 4am (then going back off to sleep), so sleeping for a much longer block. He also enjoyed the back massage!

You can find out more about our Sleep Service on our website.

Factsheet: What to do if your child isn’t getting the social care support s/he needs

The problem:

Families often contact our Legal Entitlements and Problem-Solving (LEaP) Project and tell us that they’ve been assessed by social services, but still aren’t getting the support they need. This factsheet explains what you can do if you’re in a similar situation, for example:

  • you disagree with an assessment that says that your family doesn’t need any extra support
  • the assessment and/or care plan don’t reflect the full extent of your child’s needs
  • the assessment says that your child needs support, but the council hasn’t written a care plan or put any support in place and things are ‘drifting’
  • you’ve been referred to one of the council’s ‘teams’ (e.g. Disabled Children’s Team), but the team says that your child doesn’t meet their ‘criteria’ for support
  • you’ve ‘bounced’ around the system between different teams without getting the support your family needs

First edition 2017. This edition 2017. Review date 2020.


The law:

After assessing your child’s needs, the council must then decide whether it’s necessary to provide support to meet those needs – many councils use ‘eligibility criteria’ to help them reach this decision.

In England, there are no national criteria for deciding whether a child is eligible for support and each council will have its own rules. In Wales, new national eligibility criteria have been introduced by the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014. The following principles will apply in all cases, regardless of the eligibility criteria being used:

  • councils are entitled to prioritise the support they provide so that it goes to those in greater need – eligibility criteria can be a way of ensuring that the council is acting consistently. However, those criteria must be rational and fair
  • if your child and/or your family will be put at significant risk of harm if support is not provided, then that support must be made available
  • you’re entitled to see a copy of the eligibility criteria so that you can see how the council has reached its decision
  • councils should explain the reasons for their decisions

Eligibility criteria can seem very technical and confusing – it’s important to remember that they’re just a way of measuring the impact on your child of not getting support. The more serious the consequences to your family, the greater the council’s responsibility to provide support.

The support provided by the council must meet the need: this means that the services must be of sufficient quality, must match the needs of your child/your family and the staff must have the necessary skills and training etc.


The solution:

Ask yourself

  • “What will happen to me and my family if the council doesn’t provide any support? What will the consequences be?”
  • Think about the impact on:
    • your child’s health and development
    • other children in the family
    • your own physical, mental and emotional health
    • your work or studies
    • your family relationships

Collect the evidence

  • Gather any letters, reports or other documents which explain what will happen if you don’t get the help you need – ask the professionals involved with your family, e.g. your G.P, consultants, therapists, teachers etc.

Know your rights

  • Read our Parent Guides on Social Care for more information about the assessment process and how councils decide which needs are eligible for support.

Get it in writing

  • Use our template letter to explain the consequences to your family of not getting support and to ask the council to confirm the reasons for its decisions in writing. There are separate letters for England and Wales.

Make a complaint

  • Every council must have (and publicise) a process for dealing with complaints about children’s social care. If you’re unhappy with the council’s response, you can make a complaint. Our Accessing Public Services Toolkit has more information and template letters.

This factsheet applies to England and Wales

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Life online for young people with SEN

Dawn Cavanagh

Dawn Cavanagh

Dawn Cavanagh, whose teenage son has autism, considers the benefits and challenges of life online for young people with special educational needs (SEN) and discusses ways to teach young people with SEN to navigate the internet safely, while making the most of what the internet has to offer.

Like it or not we are living in a digital age. Today, you can get online anywhere, at any time, and can communicate with almost anyone in the world. Ensuring that young people make the most of the exciting opportunities the internet has to offer, while also being helped to stay safe online is high on the public agenda. But what if your child has special educational needs (SEN)? What then?

Children with SEN include those with emotional, social or behavioural difficulties, learning difficulties, and other complex needs. There are many ways in which young people with SEN are vulnerable to danger on the internet. Children with SEN (and especially those with a diagnosis of autism) may make literal interpretations of content online, which may affect how they respond; they may not understand the concept of friendship, which may lead to them being more trusting than their peers. They may also struggle to make judgements about what information is safe to share or not recognise that they are being bullied. Furthermore, they may not appreciate how their own behaviour may be construed by someone else as bullying.

However, it is not all doom and gloom. There are benefits to using the internet for young people with SEN. The internet can be used in creative and fun ways to support learning and social interaction. For my teenage autistic son, the interactive online gaming phenomenon Minecraft allows players to build and create textured cubes in a 3D virtual world. Minecraft enables my son to have complete control of his environment and to engage in his special interests: time travel and Doctor Who. There is nothing he loves more than jumping in and out of his tardis, exploring new dimensions. Minecraft has helped to nurture his conceptual thinking, so that he has become more adept at problem solving. For example, he has worked out how to operate the tardis without any instruction. Whilst my son gets confused and distressed by others’ attempts to join him in his gaming, some young people with autism benefit from Minecraft’s multiplayer mode, which can help develop their communication and social skills, as well as enhance their creativity.

AutCraft (Duncan, 2015) is a Minecraft server specifically for autistic children and their families. The environment has been modified so that players can roam free from the dangers frequently encountered in the game’s regular modes. While all this is good, the downside of Minecraft is that like so many video games it has the potential to become addictive. This is especially concerning for children with autism who may have tendencies towards obsessive compulsive type behaviour. Excessive screen time is a recurring concern for many parents, especially in terms of time spent away from family, as well as lack of exercise.

Young people with SEN are at greater risk of cyberbullying, online grooming and exposure to inappropriate content, yet less research has been conducted in this area compared with the mainstream population. Of the body of research that currently exists, the risks for a young person with SEN appear to be more profound due to increased vulnerability and social naivety. As a group they are more likely to be lacking in sexual knowledge, have difficulties with compliance or expressing consent, as well as recognising abusive situations. Furthermore, they are less likely to have opportunities to have romantic or sexual partners, so may seek the company of strangers online and offline when lonely (Normand and Sallafranque-St-Louis, 2016).

Research has revealed that many young people with SEN have experienced cyberbullying and discriminatory behaviour such as disablist language or jokes about disability online. This can lead to considerable emotional and psychological distress. Research conducted in the Netherlands, looking at the effects of cyberbulling among students with intellectual (learning) and developmental disability, found that higher rates of cyberbullying are associated with lower levels of self-esteem and higher reported depressive feelings (Didden et al., 2009). Research undertaken by the Anti-Bullying Alliance (England and Wales) (2013) revealed that as well as having experienced cyberbullying and discriminatory behaviour many young people with SEN felt that they had not been taught how to use the internet, or to stay safe online. Moreover, some young people used the internet to create an anonymous persona to hide their disability or actively avoided the internet altogether.

A more recent study (Bannon, NcGlynn, McKenzie and Quayle, 2015) investigating the perception of online risks by young people with SEN (aged 13-18 years) in Scotland revealed that while many young people with SEN were aware of a range of risks online, and could discuss how to stay safe, not all were able to put appropriate safety strategies into practice. Some described befriending strangers on the internet. There were examples of intentional risk taking, perhaps due to peer pressure to perform. For others risk-taking in their online behaviour appeared to be linked with poor understanding of the implications of their actions and/or difficulties with inhibitory control.

There was much variation in supervision and monitoring of online behaviour, with some families putting no supervisory strategies in place, whilst others blocked access to certain content, checked history and/or placed limits on the amount of time the young person spent online. Interestingly, while some young people sought the advice of parents, and occasionally teachers, about managing online risk, many also took the opportunity to learn from peers, especially if they thought that disclosure to a family member was likely to result in removal of internet privileges. Further research is needed, perhaps including parents and teachers, in terms of how best to support young people with SEN to stay safe and strong online, whilst making the most of what the internet has to offer.

So, how do we teach young people with SEN to navigate the internet safely? The first thing is to recognise that life online presents young people with SEN with different challenges, and then to tailor strategies accordingly.  Cerebra (cited in Digital Parenting, 2016), the UK charity dedicated to improving the lives of children with neurological conditions, make the point that young people with learning difficulties can sometimes be more trusting of strangers than other young people. The Cerebra guide (cited in Digital Parenting, 2016) suggests encouraging the young person to use a pseudonym (a fictitious name) online and getting him or her to seek help from a trusted adult if anyone asks for personal information, such as their address or where they go to school. The young person might also benefit from joining an online community that has been specifically set up for people with learning difficulties.

Further suggestions for limiting risk online for children and young people with autism and learning disabilities is available in Cerebra’s guide: Learning Disabilities, Autism and Internet Safety, available on Cerebra’s website.

©Dawn Cavanagh 2017, writing as a parent contributor for the Family Research Ambassadors Project run by the Centre for Education, Development and Research (CEDAR), at the University of Warwick and Cerebra.

­­­­­­­­­References

Anti-Bullying Alliance (2013) Cyberbullying and children and young people with SEN: the views of young people. Retrieved 13th February 2017. Available from https://www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/sites/default/files/field/attachment/disabled-young-peoples-views-on-cyberbullying-report.pdf

Bannon, S., McGlynn, T., McKenzie, K. & Quayle, E (2015). The internet and young people with Additional Support Needs (ASN):  Risk and safety.  Retrieved 13th February, 2017. Available from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563215000321

Normand, C.L. & Sallafranque-St-Louis, F (2016). Cybervictimization of Young People with an Intellectual or Developmental Disability: Risks Specific to Sexual Solicitation. Retrieved 13th February, 2017. Available from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25871891

Didden, R., Scholte, R.H.J., Korzilius, H., Jan, M. H., Moor, D.E., Vermeulen, A., O’Reilly, M., Lang, R., & Lancioni, G.E (2009). Cyberbullying among students with intellectual and developmental disability in special education settings. Retrieved 13th February, 2017. Available from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19466622

Digital Parenting (2016). Vodaphone UK. Retrieved 13th February, 2017. Available from http://www.vodafone.com/content/digital-parenting.html

Duncan, S (2015). Autcraft.  Retrieved February 13th, 2017. Available from http://www.autcraft.com/

Useful links:

Anti-Bullying Alliance: http://anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/

Autcraft:  http://www.autcraft.com/

Digital Parenting website:  http://www.vodafone.com/content/digital-parenting.html

Digital Parenting magazine: http://www.vodafone.com/content/digital-parenting/learning-and-fun/digital-parenting-magazine.html

Special Friends (Free online community for people with learning disabilities, and their parents and carers): http://www.specialfriends.com/public/

Video Game Addiction Helpline: http://www.videogameaddiction.co.uk/gaming-addiction/minecraft.html

Factsheet: What to do if your child’s care package is reduced

The problem:

Families often ask for help from our Legal Entitlements and Problem-Solving (LEaP) Project because they’re unhappy with the way a local authority has changed or reduced their child’s care package.

For example:

  • a council panel reduces a family’s care package from 8 hours to 6 hours a week because of “the increased cost of agency staff”
  • direct payments are reduced without a re-assessment
  • a social worker says that a service is no longer available and there are no alternatives on offer

First edition 2017. This edition 2017. Review date 2020.


The law:

Councils must meet the eligible social care needs of disabled children. A care package should be based on an assessment of those needs and it shouldn’t be changed or reduced without a re-assessment.

For example, if a child has been assessed as being eligible for 8 hours of support per week, then the council is required to provide this support, regardless of resources. The courts have held that local authorities cannot ‘trim the assessment of need to fit the available provision’ 1, i.e. they can’t adjust a child’s level of need to suit their own resources. Once a decision has been made that a child has a certain level of need, the council must meet those needs.

If, as a result of a reassessment, the support package is reduced or changed in a significant way, the council must provide a detailed and convincing explanation as to why this is happening (for example because the child’s condition has improved substantially). The council must demonstrate why the previous level of support is no longer required.

Councils can’t rely on budgetary constraints as the sole reason for cutting a care package. Cost implications should not be taken into account when it comes to deciding whether a child has needs which are eligible for support.

When a council has decided that a child does have eligible needs, it is allowed to take its resources into account in deciding how to meet those needs. It does not have to provide a ‘gold standard’ service if a cheaper alternative would meet a child’s needs. However, any cheaper alternative must actually exist – a council can’t just suggest a care package which doesn’t in reality meet a child’s needs or cost less. Councils can’t impose arbitrary limits on what they are prepared to pay for care packages.

Councils which fail to give convincing reasons for reductions in care packages are likely to be criticised by the Ombudsman2.


The solution:

Know your rights

Read our Parent Guides on Social Care for more information about the assessment process and how councils decide which needs are eligible for support.

Collect the evidence

Gather any letters, reports or other documents which show that your child’s care needs have stayed the same (or increased) – ask the professionals involved with your family, e.g. your G.P, consultants, therapists, teachers etc.

Get it in writing

Use our template letter to challenge a proposed cut in your child’s care package.

Make a complaint

Every local authority must have (and publicise) a process for dealing with complaints about children’s social care. If you’re unhappy with the council’s response, you can make a complaint. Our Accessing Public Services Toolkit has more information and template letters.


References


1 R v Islington LBC ex p Rixon (1997-98) 1 CCLR 119

2 See, for example, the Local Government Ombudsman’s reports on investigations into complaints against Thurrock Council (10 October 2013 – www.lgo.org.uk/decisions/children-s-care-services/other/12-005-756) and London Borough of Lambeth (16 August 2012 – www.lgo.org.uk/decisions/children-s-care-services/disabled-children/11-010-725). Summaries of reports issued by the Public Services Ombudsman for Wales are available at https://www.ombudsman-wales.org.uk/en/publications/The-Ombudsmans-Casebook.aspx

This information applies to England and Wales

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New books in our library

In recent months the library has had less money to buy new books and it’s been hard to choose which books to buy out of all the new publications and suggestions from library members.

Here are our most recent new books. We’ve chosen ones on subjects we are asked for most frequently and we’ve received a few donated books too.

Books

  • L6700 Successful Social Stories for Young Children: growing up with social stories by Siobhan Timmins
    ISBN 9781785921124 2016
  • L6702 Toby and Sox: the heartwarming tale of a little boy with autism and a dog in a million by Vikky Turner
    ISBN 9781785032004 2016
  • L6698 The Out of Sync Child Grows Up: coping with sensory processing disorder in the adolescent and young adult years by Carol Stock Kranowitz
    ISBN 9780399176319 2016
    This is the latest book in the very popular series of the out of sync child books
  • L6699 Understanding Sensory Processing Disorders in Children: a guide for parents and professionals by Matt Mielnick
    ISBN 9781785927522 2017
  • L6671 Neurotribes: the legacy of autism and how to think smarter about people who think differently by Oliver Sacks
    ISBN 9781760113643 2015
    The Sunday Times Bestseller and winner of Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-fiction 2015
  • L6694 The Gentle Sleep Book: a guide for calm babies, toddlers and pre-schoolers by Sarah Ockwell-Smith
    ISBN 9780349405209 2015
  • L6685 More Than Words: helping parents promote communication and social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder by Fern Sussman
    This is an extra copy of a very popular title very kindly donated to us by a library member
  • L6708 Hope: celebrate your baby with Down Syndrome by Tania Khan
    Donated by the author
  • L6701 Special Educational Needs and Disability Discrimination in Schools: a legal handbook by Sarah Hannett et al, published by the Legal Action Group
    ISBN 9781098407764 2017

DVD

AV6691 Autism and Me by Rory Hoy
This is a very good dvd of a television documentary, explaining what it’s like to have autism, that is often recommended to people after their child has been diagnosed.

Children’s Books – ages 5 to 8+

  • C0266 Autism Superheroes by Johanna Manikiza, published by ASD Info in Wales
    Non-Fiction explaining autism to children (bilingual – in English and Welsh)
  • C0267 Autism Superheroes Comic Strip by Johanna Manikiza published by ASD Info in Wales
    Fiction explaining autism to children (bilingual – in English and Welsh)
  • C0270 Emily’s Sister by Michele Gianetti
    Fiction for the siblings of a child with dyspraxia and sensory processing disorder
  • C0269 My Book of Feelings by Tracey Ross
    Non-fiction explaining different feelings to children
  • C0268 When My Worries Get Too Big by Kari Dun Buron
    Non-fiction explaining anxiety and relaxation to children with developmental disabilities

If you are not already a member of the library fill in the form on our library page.