Tag Archives: Sarah Coldrey

Impact of Headbanging and Sensory Issues on Sleep

One of our Sleep Practitioners explains  how she helped a family struggling with head banging problems:

“Mary came to one of our sleep clinics looking for advice on her  eight year old son George who has epilepsy.

George was head banging every night, throughout the night. Mary was concerned, as he would head bang so vigorously that it would wake him up and therefore he has a very disturbed night, as did the rest of the family.

Some research suggests that head banging can be reduced by introducing a different sensory input. I suggested introducing a fan at bedtime especially as we were having quite warm weather. A fan creates white noise (a steady, unvarying unobstructive sound).

I followed up with Mary after a couple of weeks and was amazed to hear that the head banging had significantly reduced, to the point where the sores on his head had improved dramatically. I didn’t want to count my chickens, and wondered if it was just a short term fix so agreed to follow up with Mary again in another few weeks. When I spoke to Mary again I was delighted to hear that the head banging had remained reduced and George was getting significantly more sleep.

Mary said: “We have tried so many things in the past, weighted blankets, music, lights on and off and even tried white noise through a machine but the fan we use is much louder than you would think would be conducive to good sleep. Since using the fan he only wakes a couple of times a night, can usually be resettled easily and even says in bed until around 6 am. For some reason the loud noise really calms him. We would never have risked it, had it not been suggested. Thank you.”

You can find out more about our Sleep Service here.

Sleep Practitioner Sarah Tells of her Own Experience of Sleep Training

Sarah and Theo

Sarah and Theo

Our Sleep Practitioner Sarah Coldrey is used to helping families with their sleep difficulties but, as she explains, that doesn’t mean she doesn’t experience the same difficulties with her child Theo. Theo was born prematurely and Sarah updated us on his progress as well as how she settled Theo into a better bedtime routine.

When Theo reached one we found that we were in a fairly good routine. He would wake around 6.30am, have 2 short naps a day and then bedtime was around 7pm. He was generally asleep within 10 minutes.

We followed the same bedtime routine every day. At 6.15pm he would have a bottle of warm milk downstairs, we would then go upstairs and Theo would have a bath for about 15 minutes. We would then go straight to the bedroom and get into pyjamas. Once ready for bed we would sit and read a few stories in dim lighting. I would then carry him to his cot and sing twinkle twinkle little star, I would leave the room and Theo would self-settle to sleep in a dark room with black out blinds, sometimes he cried but it was only for a minute or two.

Between ages one and two Theo slept generally very well and we felt lucky. Sometimes he would wake in the early hours but we found that this was probably because his room was getting quite cold and so we put a heater in his room over the winter that came on around 4am. This seemed to improve the situation and Theo would sleep until at least 6am.

Around the age of two, Theo started to wake in the night. I found this confusing as he was able to self settle to sleep and so I didn’t feel there was an obvious reason why he wouldn’t be able to re settle himself during the night. I did however feel that Theo was going through some developmental changes. His language was coming on and he was starting to potty train. He was also very clingy when I dropped him to nursery (normally he couldn’t have cared less when I left him)

For the first few night wakes, it was such a shock to the system that we just bought Theo into our bed as most people do (even though I’m a sleep practitioner, I’m still human and the need for sleep took precedent).

For some people co sleeping works well, but for us it did not as Theo tended to fidget all night and somehow take up nearly an entire double bed and so we needed a new plan.

Initially I used a chair bed (a fold out foam bed) and would lay on the floor next to his cot and sometimes hold his hand.

After doing this for a few days, I decided I was being too soft and wanted to move things along, so I moved onto a single bed that was in his room but was much further away from his cot. I felt pleased about this because he wasn’t coming into our bed and I was able to create a bit of distance between him whilst still being in his room.

Fast-forward a couple of months, Theo seems more settled in himself and goes to nursery happily again. Some nights he wakes in the night and we will leave him to self-settle back to sleep and some nights we know that he probably needs the comfort of having us nearby and so we still go into his room and sleep on the single bed. This is not ideal but it works for us in our real life. Theo continues to self-settle at bedtime and so I’m confident his good sleep habits will return.

However – I know we have a whole new battle ahead of us when we transfer Theo from a cot to a bed!

You can find out more about our Sleep Service here, or call our freephone helpline on 0800 328 1159.

 

Better Bedtime Routine

Our Sleep Practitioners provide support for families on a range of sleep issues. One of our Sleep Practitioners, Sarah Coldrey was recently able to Oscar settle into a regular bedtime routine. His mum explained how this has helped.

“I’ve just put Oscar to bed. It’s 9.15pm and I’m now sat downstairs enjoying peace and quiet while he settles… In his own bed, in his own bedroom, upstairs alone.

He may wake up once during the night. If he does, I will return him to his bed and he will go back off to sleep, usually within 10 minutes… no great fuss.

Nowadays, more often than not he does not wake during the night.

He will wake at around 6am and sometimes climbs into our bed for a cuddle before dozing for another hour. Some mornings he is awake a little earlier, at around 5am, but again dozes until it is time to get up. And on rare mornings he wakes up at about 6am and he doesn’t need to doze, so we get up.

But gone are the 4.30am-5.30am regular starts to our day.

Also gone are the two hours spent settling him every night, with one of us having to stay in his bedroom until he finally fell asleep at gone 10pm.

Gone, too, are the night wakings, often up to three or four times between going to sleep at around 10.15pm and starting the following day at 5am.

What we have now is something that, just a few months ago, was unimaginable.

Last August, Oscar was nine years old, a month away from his ASC diagnosis and had never slept the night through. He had always needed us with him to settle. He had always woken throughout the night. And very often he was awake for the day before sunrise.

And then we embarked on a Cerebra sleep programme with the lovely Sarah Coldrey, who visited us and gave sound advice about Oscar’s bedtime routine (we had a routine in place so we just needed to tweak it!), a plan to follow for settling and managing night wakings and, most importantly, the inspiration for us to succeed.

Sarah explained how what seemed like the unachievable was, in fact, quite achievable – slowly.

All we had to do was follow the plan. We were in it for the long haul, not expecting this to be a quick fix. But, just three months after starting the sleep programme, we were seeing results.

Our gradual withdrawal from Oscar’s bedroom as he settled turned out to be easier than we had ever thought possible. We’d previously attempted something similar but had given up because we had, in hindsight, expected progress to be much quicker.

This time we took baby steps – and they worked.

Oscar is now functioning much better during the day. He says he is ‘not as grumpy’ – positive proof that a good night’s sleep is good for everyone!

Thanks Cerebra, thanks Sarah!”

If you’d like some help from our Sleep Service you can find out more here.

Sleep and Head Banging

Child crying in a cotHead banging is just one of the issues that our Sleep Practitioners can help families with. It’s a difficult behaviour to eradicate because it generally happens while the child is sleeping. Often it’s only possible to manage the behaviour rather than being able to remove it entirely.

Often it’s the noise that the child makes while head banging that’s the problem, especially for the rest of the family.

Some strategies that may help include introducing a different sensory input, like white noise music for example. Also, if a child is banging their head against the wall, you could consider moving their bed away from the wall. Or, if your child is banging on the bed frame or head board, consider putting the mattress directly on the floor and removing the frame or board.

Sarah Coldrey, our Sleep Practitioner for the South West recently worked with a family who had a child who was head banging on his mattress. He wouldn’t use a pillow and, because his parent’s room was just next door, it was making enough noise to disturb the their sleep. Sarah recommended changing to a memory foam mattress or topper, with the hope that the mattress would be softer and potentially reduce the noise.

A few weeks later, the family told Sarah that they had purchased a memory foam mattress straight away and they had not heard their son head banging since.

Find out more about our Sleep Service and contact us for advice.

Teenage Sleep

sleeping-boy-1024x683Back in 2015, Sarah Coldrey, our Sleep Practitioner in the South West met with the Hunter family from Brixham.

The Hunters have three children and their eldest son, who has ADHD was having sleep issues. The fifteen year old wasn’t falling asleep until 5am most days and was missing a lot of school.

She recommended a technique called Chronotherapy which involves altering bedtimes each night. Instead of moving the bedtime backwards gradually as you would with young children, which takes a long time to do and isn’t as successful in older children, you move it forwards by a few hours each day.

Here is an example of how the times can be moved:

1st night: sleep at 4 a.m., wake at 12 midday

2nd night: sleep at 7 a.m., wake at 3 p.m.

3rd night: sleep at 10 a.m., wake at 6 p.m.

4th night: sleep at 1 p.m., wake at 9 p.m.

5th night: sleep at 4 p.m., wake at 12 p.m.

6th night: sleep at 7 p.m., wake at 3 a.m.

7th night: sleep at 10 p.m., wake at 6 a.m.

Sarah was reluctant to suggest this technique initially because of the need to monitor the times closely and consistently. However, the family were willing to try anything that could have a positive effect on their son, who had exams coming up.

Sarah followed up with the family a couple of weeks later and was delighted to hear that the technique had been successful and the teenager had been sleeping from 10pm-6am everyday for a week and had not missed school for a whole week, which was the first time in a long time.

Fast forward to eighteen months later and the now seventeen year old teenager is still sleeping well. He currently sleeps from 11pm-7am and has slept well since the programme was introduced. He goes to college now and doesn’t miss classes.

When Sarah caught up with the family she was delighted to hear that the family have still been experiencing success from implementing the programme. Lee, the father plans to implement the same plan with their younger son who also has ADHD and struggles to settle. Lee said he would definitely recommend the technique for children that aren’t falling asleep until the early hours and also commented that the programme gave him chance to spend time and bond with his son.

Find out more about our Sleep Service and contact us for advice.