Tag Archives: ADHD

Books on ADHD in the library

Check out the books on ADHD that you can borrow from our postal lending library for free.

For parents

  • L6329 & L6365 ADHD Living Without Brakes by Martin Kutscher
  • L6450 & L6578 Calm Your Hyperactive Child: coping with ADHD and other behavioural problems by Sabina Dosani
  • L6727 Power Parenting for Children with ADD/ADHD: a practical parent’s guide for managing difficult behaviours by Grad Flick
  • L6508 Helping Hyperactive Kids A Sensory Integration Approach: techniques and tips for parents and professionals by Lynn Horowitz
  • L6338 The ADD/ADHD Checklist: a practical reference for parents and teachers by Sandra Rief
  • L6400 ADHD Handbook for Families: a guide to communicating with professionals by Paul Weingartner
  • L6401 Step by Step Help For Your Children with ADHD: a self-help manual for parents by Cathy Lever-Bradbury
  • L6402 Helping Kids and Teens with ADHD by Joanne Steer
  • L6379 ADHD Homework Challenges Transformed: creative ways to achieve focus and attention by building on ADHD traits by Harriet Hope Green
  • L6459 What Causes ADHD? By Joel Nigg
  • L6559 The ADHD Parenting Handbook: practical advice for parents from parents by Colleen Alexander-Roberts
  • L6649 ADHD Does Not Exist: the truth about attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder by Richard Saul
  • L6715 The Family ADHD Solution: a scientific approach to maximizing your child’s attention and minimizing parental stress by Mark Bertin

Autobiographical

  • L6020 Marching to a Different Tune: diary about an ADHD boy by Jacky Fletcher
  • L6248 Only a Mother Could Love Him by Ben Polis
  • L6135 ADHD: an autobiography of survival by Dr Richard Kuendig
  • L6306 ADHD: a challenging journey by Anna Richards
  • L6507 The Boy From Hell: life with a boy with ADHD by Alison Thompson

For kids

  • C0216 Can I Tell You About ADHD? A guide for family friends and professionals by Susan Varney
  • C0117 Girls Guide to ADHD by Beth Walker
  • C0062 Putting on the Brakes: young peoples guide to understanding ADHD by Patricia Quinn
  • C0061 Jumpin Johnny Get Back To Work by Michael Gordon

Novels for kids

  • C0058 Sparkys Excellent Misadventures by Phyllis Carpenter
  • C0059 Eagle Eyes: a child’s guide to paying attention by Jeanne Gehret
  • C0069 Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key by Jack Gantos
  • C0070 Joey Pigza Loses Control by Jack Gantos
  • C0071 What Would Joey Do? By Jack Gantos

Sensory Items

  • Fidget Kits
  • Sensory Seeking Kits
  • Relaxation Sensory Kits

To borrow any of these books contact janetp@cerebra.org.uk or to find out more about our library look at our library page.

Sexuality, Autism and Young People – Families Study

The Sexuality, Autism, and Young People- Families study (SAY-Families) is a joint project between Warwick, Bangor and Glasgow Universities.  Researcher Stacey Hunter explains more about the study and how you can get involved.

“The aim of the SAY-Families study is to find out about how the parents of young people with High Functioning Autism or Asperger syndrome talk to their children about relationships and sex education. A developing sexuality is one of the key challenges that young people face as they grow up, and it is important to find out about families’ experiences of supporting their child in this sensitive area. It is hoped that by finding out parents’ views and experiences, the study will be able to inform the development of support materials for young people and their families.

To find out parents’ views and experiences, we are carrying out one-to-one interviews and have developed an online survey. If you think you might like to take part in either part of the study, more information is below. If you would like to talk to one of the research team, please also feel free to give us a call, we would be more than happy to hear from you (our contact details are also below).

The face-to-face interview

We would like to speak with the parents of young people aged between 16 and 30 years old, who also have a sibling of a similar age that is the same gender as them. This is because we would like to find out if your experiences of supporting each of your children in this area have been similar or different.

One of the research team, will speak with you on the phone to arrange a time that is suitable for you to take part in an interview. The interview can take place in your home or somewhere else that is convenient. You can also arrange for your interview to take place over the phone, if that suits you better. The interview will last roughly 45 minutes.

Online Survey

We are also looking for the parents of young people with High Functioning Autism or Aspergers aged between 16 and 30 years old to fill in an online survey. The survey can be completed by one or both parents of a young person. If you would like to take part as a couple, we ask that you fill in the survey independently and indicate that you would like your responses to be linked.
You can access the online survey here. 

Many thanks for taking the time to read about the SAY-Families study. If you would like to take part or would just like find out more about the project please do not hesitate to contact us:

Stacey Hunter
School of Psychology
Brigantia Building
Bangor University
Bangor, Gwynedd
LL57 2AS

Tel: 01248 388255
Email: Stacey.Hunter@bangor.ac.uk

Teenage sleep problem solved

Sleeping boyLack of sleep can be a problem for many families, particularly those who have children with a neurological condition. Although sleep problems tend to be associated with younger children, older children and teenagers often need help too.

Cerebra’s Sleep Service provides advice and support to families trying to get a good night’s sleep. Sarah Coldrey, our Sleep Practitioner in the South West recently met with a family whose teenage son’s sleep routine was disrupting his education.

The Hunters have 3 children and sought our help with the sleep issues their eldest son was having – he is 15 years old and has ADHD.  The teenager wasn’t falling asleep until 5am most days and was very tired and missing a lot of school as a result. With important exams ahead this was becoming a real issue.

After meeting with the family and thoroughly assessing their individual circumstances Sarah recommended a technique called ‘Chronotherapy’. This involves altering bedtimes each night, but instead of moving the bedtime backwards gradually as you would with young children (this would take a long time to do and in older children isn’t as successful), you move it forwards, by a few hours each day.

Here is an example of how the times can be moved:

  • 1st night: sleep at 4 a.m., wake at 12 midday
  • 2nd night: sleep at 7 a.m., wake at 3 p.m.
  • 3rd night: sleep at 10 a.m., wake at 6 p.m.
  • 4th night: sleep at 1 p.m., wake at 9 p.m.
  • 5th night: sleep at 4 p.m., wake at 12 p.m.
  • 6th night: sleep at 7 p.m., wake at 3 a.m.
  • 7th night: sleep at 10 p.m., wake at 6 a.m.

This technique can be difficult to introduce as it needs careful management – a parent or carer needs to monitor the child and keep consistently to the timings identified above.

Despite having other children and health issues the family were determined to give their son the best possible chance with his exams and were keen to give the plan a go.

Sarah followed up with the family a couple of weeks later and was delighted to hear that the technique had been successful. The teenager had been consistently sleeping from 10pm – 6am every night and as a result had not missed school for a whole week, a dramatic improvement. Ironically the only issue the family were having was that their son now wanted to go to sleep before 10pm!

For individual advice on your family’s sleep problems please get in touch with our sleep service.

Accessing Services: The View From a Parent

Alison Thompson

Alison Thompson

Alison Thompson is an author, speaker and mum to Daniel, who was diagnosed with ADHD when he was six. This is her heartfelt account of the troubles she has faced when trying to access services for Daniel.
My son Daniel was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder when he was six, but I’d known there was something wrong long before that. He was a fretful and anxious baby who rarely slept, and as a toddler he was constantly on the go. We went to a local parent and toddler group and he was the child you’ve all seen, running round the room knocking over the other children’s Lego towers, climbing the shelves to get what he wanted from the top, throwing paint on the floor causing chaos. At story time I had to wrestle him to the floor to get him to sit still, and even then he’d be calling things out and distracting the rest of the group.

Daniel was a caring, funny, quirky little boy, with a charming smile and a wicked sense of humour – though he had some strange obsessions. He had a purple teddy bear called Strum who went everywhere with him, and Daniel could not get to sleep if Strum wasn’t there. One day we left Strum behind at a motorway service station and I did a sixty mile round trip to retrieve him, because I knew what a nightmare bedtime would be without him! For a while Daniel was also obsessed with Only Fools and Horses. He could recite some of the episodes word for word – which was fine until the day he told a friend to “Shut up, you tart!” I was mortified.

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

But there was a darker side to Daniel too. He couldn’t concentrate on anything for very long and he seemed to drift off into his own little world at times. At meal times I’d have to remind him he was meant to be eating as his fork would stop halfway between the plate and his mouth, and in the mornings I’d leave him to get dressed and come back to find him in his room, one leg in and one leg out of his trousers because some toy or game had caught his attention. But the worst thing was the tantrums. Like Jekyll and Hyde, the smallest thing would set him off and he would turn into a mini Incredible Hulk, lashing out at anyone or anything that got in his way. He’d have several meltdowns a day and they could last for hours. Our home was full of holes in the walls and my daughter and I were constantly covered in bruises.

Daniel started at nursery but he didn’t seem to fit in with the other children, somehow he wasn’t in sync with them, and his domineering personality caused problems. At the end of the year, the teacher recommended I see my doctor because she felt there was more going on than normal toddler tantrums, and I agreed. The GP referred us to a paediatrician who said Daniel was “borderline ADHD” – which meant nothing, really.

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