The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

cerebra-centre-logoIn this article we outline the research being carried out at the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the University of Birmingham.

Over the last 6 years (2008-2013), Cerebra has provided the core funding for The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, a research centre based at the School of Psychology at the University of Birmingham, headed by Professor Chris Oliver.

The aims of the centre for the first six years of funding (2008-2013) were:

  • to carry out longitudinal, cross syndrome data collection to describe and understand the genetic, physical, neurological, cognitive and behavioural characteristics of children and young adults with genetic disorders associated with neurodevelopmental disorders
  • to conduct exploratory and hypothesis-driven experimental research projects that seek to discover the causes of and effective interventions for behavioural, cognitive and emotional problems in children and young adults with genetic disorders, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder
  • to disseminate research findings of relevance to all children and young adults with neurological impairments, intellectual and developmental disabilities who show behavioural, cognitive and emotional problems.
  • To read more about the current and past research projects, please visit the centre’s project pages, or read their annual report on the Cerebra website.  In this video a researcher at the centre explains the impact their research has for children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their families.

    The next 6 years

    Cerebra are delighted to be in a position to provide core funding for the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders for a further 6 years (2014-2019). The research taking place will continue to focus on understanding and ameliorating the clinically and socially significant problems that are experienced by children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their families. The centre will focus on three areas of research:

  • refining the behavioural phenotypes of genetic disorders
  • understanding the causes of clinically and socially significant problems experienced by children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their families
  • developing an early intervention strategy to prevent the development of these problems.
  • Understanding and reducing sleep disorders in children with developmental delay

    Cerebra have awarded additional funding to the centre to conduct research that will describe and assess sleep disorders in three groups of children at the highest risk for severe and persistent sleep problems:

  • children with Angelman syndrome
  • children with Smith-Magenis syndrome
  • children with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder.
  • The contrasting nature of the sleep disorders will allow the project to:

  • identify critical points for intervention that are disorder-sensitive
  • compare and contrast the effects of different types of sleep disorders on parental wellbeing and physical health
  • develop and trial disorder-sensitive sleep assessment protocols
  • evaluate the effects of behavioural management in proof of principle studies
  • develop cloud and internet resources to facilitate assessment, sleep consultancy, intervention and dissemination.
  • The study of sleep disorders in these three groups affords the opportunity to describe the relationship between different types of sleep disorders in children and their relationship to disturbed sleep, stress, poor physical health and coping in parents. These research findings will be invaluable to inform the Cerebra Sleep Service.

    Further Inform Neurogenetic Disorders (FIND) website development

    Cerebra also co-fund a website project with the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), led by the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, that aims to get these research findings about rare genetic syndromes to families and professionals quickly and effectively. The website is named ‘Further Inform Neurogenetic Disorders (FIND)’, and will be launched in September 2014. Keep an eye out for the launch!

    For more information on FIND and the services provided please click on this link to be directed through to the website:  http://www.findresources.co.uk/about-us