Sleep Practitioner Shares Premature Birth Experience

Sarah with Theo

Sarah with Theo

Sarah Coldrey, Cerebra’s Sleep Practitioner for the South West, has just returned to work after taking a year’s maternity leave to look after her new baby, Theo. Theo was born at just 29 weeks gestation but is now coming on in leaps and bounds. Sarah told us about her experience:

“I was rather shocked when my waters broke at 28 weeks. I was sent to Derriford Hospital in Plymouth, where one week later I gave birth to my son Theo James Coldrey at 29 weeks gestation. He weighed 2lb 14oz.

Theo was immediately taken to neonatal intensive care and was supported with oxygen, kept in an incubator and tube fed with expressed breast milk.

He remained in the incubator and on oxygen for 5 weeks. Theo was then transferred to Torbay hospital where he was able to go into a normal cot, no longer needed help with his breathing and began to transition to breast feeding. We stayed in Torbay hospital for 3 weeks.

Theo now

Theo now

Theo and I were able to go home after 8 weeks. He would have been 37weeks gestation at this point, but was actually already 2 months old.

Theo will be turning 1 this weekend (8th May)  and is gradually catching up with his peers. He is a happy, inquisitive boy who definitely know what he wants.  I admit that I am happy to be back at work part time!”

Sarah is Cerebra’s Sleep Practitioner for the south west. We have a team of sleep practitioners covering the UK who can offer help and advice on sleep issues, including settling problems, difficulty sleeping alone and early rising. You can find out more about our sleep service here or contact us on 01267 244210 or sleep@cerebra.org.uk.

 

 

Theo in an incubator

Theo in an incubator

Preventing premature births is a cause close to Cerebra’s heart. We fund research at Leeds University into understanding premature birth and predicting mums at risk of early delivery. Our aim is to prevent it from happening, so that fewer babies need neonatal intensive care and do not suffer the complications of being born too early. Over the period of Cerebra’s funding this work has led to a fall in premature birth rates with almost 350 fewer babies each year being born too soon. You can read more and watch a short film here.