Books on Special Educational Needs

Library booksWe’re often asked for books or resources on special education. Here’s a list of titles we have on the SEN system, inclusion and special provision as well as those written for teachers and home schooling.

Special Educational Needs system

L6327 and L6383 – Choosing a School for a Child with Special Needs by Ruth Birnbaum
L6518 – The Journey Through Assessment: help for parents with special needs child by Antonia Chitty
L6341 – Surviving the Special Educational Needs System: how to be a velvet bulldozer by Sandy Row
L6322 – Guerilla Mum: surviving the special needs education jungle by Ellen Power
Inclusion
L6167 – Special Educational Needs a Parents’ Guide by Antonia Chitty
L6213 – Special Educational Needs Inclusion and Diversity by Norah Frederickson
L6370 – Key Issues in Special Educational Needs and Inclusion by Alan Hodkinson
L6342 – How To Reach and Teach All Students in the Inclusive Classroom by Sandra Rief
L6455 – Including Me: managing complex health needs in schools and early years settings by Jeanne Carlin
L6513 – How To Make School Make Sense: a parents’ guide to helping the child with Asperger Syndrome by Clare Lawrence
L1687 – Walk in Their Shoes: a day in the life of an spld student by Edwina Cole
L6033 – Meeting the Learning Needs of All Children: personalised learning in the primary school by Joan Dean

Special provision

L6501 – Personalised Learning for Young People with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties by Andrew Colley

Particularly for teachers

L6427 – A Practical Guide for Teachers of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Secondary School Education by Debra Costley
L6412 – Transforming the Role of the SENCO: achieving the national award for sen co-ordination by Fiona Hallett

Home schooling

L6143 – Teaching at Home: a new approach to tutoring children with autism and Aspergers Syndrome by Olga Holland
L6430 – Autism and Flexischooling: a shared classroom and home schooling approach by Clare Lawrence

Another success for Legal Entitlements Project

Cerebra’s Legal Entitlements Research Project has provided advice on the reassessment of continence services for a little girl with cerebral palsy.

We were recently contacted by the mother of an eight year old girl, Jinny*, who has quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Jinny had previously been assessed as requiring five continence pads each day. Jinny’s mother, Mandy*, explained that she was concerned how the review of continence needs was being conducted.

A local NHS body had asked for Jinny’s continence needs to be reassessed, stipulating that this must take place over a three day period for fluid and a two week period for stools. Because the assessment had to be completed within four weeks, part of the assessment would have had to be undertaken while Jinny was at school. Mandy was worried about the assessment having to take place during term time. She was concerned that Jinny would be embarrassed and stigmatised if the assessment took place at school. In fact, she was considering withdrawing Jinny from school for two weeks in order to carry out the assessment at home.

Mandy was also worried because the NHS body wrote to her stating that if the reassessment was not undertaken within the specified timetable, there may be a delay in the delivery of continence products. Going further than this, an NHS employee told Mandy in a telephone conversation that if the assessment was not carried out in the stipulated time period, the continence supplies would be stopped. This was despite the fact that Jinny’s community nurse was willing to confirm that Jinny still needed the continence products.

After Mandy contacted Cerebra, a referral was made to the Cerebra Legal Entitlements Research Project at Cardiff Law School. Under this scheme, law students, under the supervision of academic staff and qualified solicitors, research relevant areas of the law and offer guidance for families who are not receiving their legal entitlements.

Mandy was advised that several legal issues had been identified. The main legal points were that:-

  • NHS bodies have a duty, under section 2 of the Health Act 2009, to take into account the individual needs of patients and to ensure that policies do not discriminate against patients, even inadvertently.
  • The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on paediatric continence services emphasise that treatment should be adapted to the needs and circumstances of children and their families; the views of children and their families should be taken into account; that continence problems can lead to bullying; and reducing unnecessary invasive examinations and procedures is a key clinical issue.
  • Department of Health good practice guidance advises that children should not be excluded from school activities due to incontinence and children’s dignity and independence should be protected through the implementation of appropriate systems of care which also avoid the risk of bullying.
  • Under the Equality Act 2010, it is unlawful discrimination to have a policy that disadvantages a disabled child and there is a duty to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people
  • Under the European Convention on Human Rights 1998, it is unlawful to fail to provide timely health support to a disabled child and to threaten its withdrawal.

Cardiff Law School sent its legal opinion to Mandy. This explained the legal points outlined above and highlighted that the way in which the NHS body had approached the review of Jinny’s continence services had fallen short of its public law obligations and that it had acted unreasonably. It also pointed out that it would be unlikely for the continence needs of an eight year old girl with quadriplegic cerebral palsy to diminish over time. The opinion concluded that:

“one would hope that the NHS body would undertake a fundamental review of the implementation of the policy and in the instant case demonstrate considerably greater flexibility (for example by allowing the assessment to be undertaken during the school holidays)”.

Mandy forwarded this opinion to the relevant NHS body. This clearly had an impact as she reported back that she was able to order the next supply of continence pads without the need for the assessment to take place during term time.

Can our Legal Entitlements Project help you? Find out more here.

* names have been changed.

GoTo Seat is a hit

Cerebra bear and the Goto seatSales of the brilliant GoTo seat are raising money for Cerebra.

We have kept you up to date with the development of one of our Innovation Centre’s design exploits – the joint venture between Leckey and ourselves to develop the Goto Seat.

Because the original design idea was ours we have a contract with Leckey called a Licensing Agreement. This means that every time they sell a Goto Seat they pay Cerebra a royalty fee to support the work we do and enable us to help more children and to develop even more innovative products.

The first quarterly sales figures are in and Cerebra have received £1192 in royalties! We are delighted and would like to thank everyone at Leckey for all their hard work developing our idea into such a successful product.

Sales of the the GoTo seat have continued to grow with the launch of the new size 2 seat which is suitable for children between 2 and 5 years of age. It offers an adjustable headrest, extended leg supports and a stronger backrest making it supportive enough for mild to moderate postural needs.

Cerebra Ambassador Chris Bennett and his son Elliott have been using the GoTo seat at dinner time instead of a high chair and told us “It’s brilliant – it makes dinner time more of a family thing as he’s closer to us and can eat from the table”.

We look forward to designing more products to add to the list and will keep you informed of all of our future developments!